About Robin

About Robin

Cover2’s podcast with Robin

Robin Star’s passion is helping parents navigate the world of addiction and substance abuse. In her private practice she uses a science based program backed by 40 years of clinical research. Robin’s coaching uses these evidence based methods to empower parents to motivate their child who struggles with alcohol or drug abuse to seek treatment. On an individual or family basis she provides tools needed to traverse the challenges of coping with children addicted to drugs or alcohol (Substance Use Disorder).

She is the group facilitator for Parents of Addicted Children™, a support group founded in 1999 for parents who are experiencing on-going life problems due to their child’s (children of all ages) use of alcohol and/or drugs. Robin believes assisting the parents to help themselves is one of the most important single thing they can do to help their child.

Robin also coaches parents through “Take Back Your Life”™, a 4 week course which teaches parents more effective ways to deal with their child who has Substance Use Disorder and learn how to set healthy boundaries, stop losing themselves in the child’s problematic behavior and help parents move from feelings of shame, isolation, hopelessness and helplessness to an increased feeling of hope and a sense of effectiveness. In order for parents to know how to stop losing themselves in their child’s addiction they need to learn that the only behavior they can control is their own.

Robin is a graduate of the University of Denver with a BS/BA, and is a Gestalt Professional Certified Coach with a specialty in coaching families with children struggling with alcohol or drugs.

Robin is certified in Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training (CRAFT) as a Parent Network Coach, trained by the Center for Motivation and Change and works with the Partnership for Drug Free Kids. Robin provides pragmatic behavioral coaching, alternative and practical client centered solutions. She works privately with families and facilitates group learning on how to support a loved one before, during and after change.

Robin Star is a member of the Cuyahoga County Opiate Task Force and active in the education sub-committee and the founder of Star Group.

“Every day may not be good, but there is something good in every day.”

Your strongest muscle and worst enemy is your mind. Train it well.

“Until you realize you are the creator of your own misery you will never be truly happy. For it is how you react to any given situation that brings you happiness.”

“Treat others with kindness. You never know what burdens people bear or what they are going through. You may have power to lift their spirits or break them.”

Sometimes we get angry with people, when we should be angry with ourselves, because we gave them the power to change our mood and feelings.”

“I think that the best thing we can do for our children is to allow them to do things for themselves, allow them to be strong, allow them to experience life on their own terms…let them be better people, let them believe more in themselves.”

“Living Life fully means not waiting for the storm to pass, but learning to dance between the raindrops”

“You don’t need a plan, sometimes you just need to breathe, trust, let go and see what happens.”

“Laugh when you can, apologize when you should, let go of what you can’t change.”

“You never know how STRONG you are until being STRONG is the only choice you have.”

“The past does not equal the future.”

“Our lives are not determined by what happens to us, but by how we react to what happens. Not by what life brings to us, but by the attitude we bring to life. A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events and outcomes. It is a catalyst, a spark that creates extraordinary results.”

“Worry doesn’t take away the pain of tomorrow, but sucks the happiness and joy for today.”

“Consider how hard it is to change yourself and you’ll understand what little chance you have in trying to change others.”

“Don’t keep taking the same road, expecting it to get you somewhere else.”

“Stop being afraid of what could go wrong and start being positive about what could go right.”

“Worry is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it doesn’t get you anywhere.”

“If you stumble, make it part of the dance!”

“Do not let the behavior of others destroy your inner peace.”

Dalai Lama

“Sometimes people with the worst pasts end up creating the best futures.”

“Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better do better.”

Maya Angelou

“You can’t force someone to respect you, but you can refuse to be disrespected.”

“Don’t judge a situation you have never been in.”

“I am committed to own my own problems and let others own theirs.”

“To let go is to fear less and to love more. To let go is not to care for, but to care about.”

“Serenity is not freedom from the storm, but peace amidst the storm.”

“Worry is a choice.”

“My worst fears can come true, whether I anguish over them or not.”

“One of the happiest moments ever is when you find the courage to let go of what you can’t change.”

“It is not what you do for your children, but what you have taught them to do for themselves, that will make them successful human beings.”

Ann Landers
“Transform sorrow into strength, pain into growth and fear into trust.”

“We don’t have control over the actions of others. We do have control over how we allow their actions to affect us.”

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

Maya Angelou

“We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are.”

Ego says: “Once everything falls into place, I will find peace.”
Spirit says: “Find peace and everything will fall into place.”

“Celebrate what you want to see more of.”

“If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude about it.”

Maya Angelou

“You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.”

Maya Angelou

“Every child is gifted. They just unwrap their packages at different times.”

“So, for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears and keep reminding yourself everything happens for a reason.”

“May your choices reflect your hopes and not your fears!”

“Sometimes we’re tested. Not to show our weaknesses, but to discover our strengths.”

“Promise me you’ll always remember that you’re braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.”

Christopher Robin to Winnie the Pooh

“I, not events, have the power to make me happy or unhappy. I think I will be happy today!”

“Worry is a total waste of time. It doesn’t change anything. All it does is steal your joy and keeps you very busy doing nothing.”

“Forgive them even if they are not sorry. Holding on to anger only hurts you, not them.”

“One small positive thought in the morning can change your whole day.”
“Pessimism never won any battle.”

“At some point you just have to let go of what you thought should happen and live in what is happening.”

“Sometimes we need someone to simply be there…Not to fix anything in particular, but just to let us feel we are supported and cared about.”

“Love isn’t a state of perfect caring. It is an active noun like struggle. To love someone is to strive to accept that person exactly the way he or she is, right here and now.”

Fred Rogers

“Strength is when you have so much to cry for, but you choose to smile instead.”

“What if I fall? Oh, but my darling, what if you fly?”

e.h.

“When life changes to be harder, change yourself to be stronger.”

“Don’t expect anyone to understand your journey, especially if they’ve never walked your path.”

“Storms in your life can be followed by rainbows.”

“Let go of what I cannot control.”

“If you judge people, you have no time to love them.”

Mother Theresa

“When someone is trying to change their ways, the worst thing you can do is keep bringing up the past.”

“Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

Theodore Roosevelt

“It’s not selfish to love yourself, take care of yourself, and make your happiness a priority. It’s necessary.”

“One day can change everything…”

“We must let go of the life we had planned so at to have the life that is waiting for us.”

“We liberate children not by making them work for our love, but by letting them rest in it.”

Gordon Newfeld

Piglet: “How do you spell love?”

Pooh: “You don’t spell it, you feel it.”

“Be selective in your battles, sometimes peace is better than being right.”

“Don’t expect everyone to understand your journey, especially if they’ve never had to walk your path.”

“Perhaps the butterfly is proof that you can go through a great deal of darkness yet become something beautiful.”

“One of the hardest decisions you’ll ever face in life is choosing whether to walk away or try harder.”

“One of the hardest lessons in life is letting go. Whether its guilt, anger, love, loss or betrayal. Change is never easy. We fight to hold on and we fight to let go.”

“Just because something is not happening for you right now does not mean that it will never happen.”

Ready to get started? Let’s schedule your confidential complimentary 30 minute consultation with Robin.

Robin’s Story

I believe that despite our many differences we all have learned a certain constant early in life and that is, you can always expect the unexpected.

A number of years ago I was faced with a huge, much unexpected challenge, A family member was in crisis in the midst of a drug addiction and I was not even remotely prepared to help. I am not sure anyone is equipped to help when they are first brought into the world of addiction. It is a frightful place and I can say that my path through it was difficult to traverse. I liken the experience to arriving on a new planet and having no idea what to do, where to go, or even what language to speak. And yet, I desperately wanted to be a support for this person I loved.

As I searched for answers on how to help, I was struck by how many people were affected by addiction-not only the number of people in active addiction, but by the number of loved ones that were riding the roller coaster of addiction with them. And yet, in so many cases, the stigma of this disease put families in hiding and left them helpless when what they needed was so much support. As I say, Substance Use Disorder (AKA Addiction) is not a casserole disease. Our neighbors and friends are not running over with a helping hand as they do with other illnesses.

As I searched for answers, I began to learn the language of addiction and recovery as well as the resources available. I cannot pinpoint exactly when my metamorphosis occurred but somewhere on this course, I went from feeling powerless and confused to knowledgeable and empowered.

In the most unexpected places, Doors began to open, ideas and knowledge presented themselves, and people came into my path at first providing help and comfort and later looking to me for guidance.

I was not seeking this 180 degree change in my life…It took me some time to realize that the physical, and emotional turmoil that I had been experiencing had actually delivered me to my next role…I became the confidante, the advisor, the shoulder to cry on, the book of resources and the beacon of hope and possibilities for families struggling with addiction issues.

I went back to school, found a whole new career, facilitated a support group became certified in an evidence based program by the Partnership for Drug Free Kids and opened my own private practice with a strong sense of purpose that is fulfilling beyond what I thought possible. Instead of being a victim of this battle, I am now helping to empower others who are challenged with this issue, and have found purpose… which I didn’t even know I was looking for…

I embrace a personalized approach tailored to each client’s individual needs. My approach is diverse, in addition to adhering to Gestalt theory coaching, I also derive my background from an intervention perspective, the scientific and evidence based programs from the Center for Motivation and Change as well as the Partnership for Drug Free Kids where I have been trained in the Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT).  My experience, passion and education makes me uniquely qualified to do this work with parents.

Robin is the founder of Star Group and graduated from the Gestalt Professional Certified Coaching Institute in 2014.

CREDENTIALS:

Gestalt Professional Certified Coach

University of Denver, BS/BA

Field Model of Intervention

Center for Motivation and Change

Partnership for Drug Free Kids, Certified in Community Reinforcement and Family training

Parent Support Network for the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids using CRAFT, the evidence based program.

Cuyahoga Opiate Task Force

Serve on various substance abuse advisory boards.

Certificate of Completion – Robert J. Meyers, Ph.D.& Associates, Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT)

Resident of Northeast Ohio and work with parents across The USA and Canada.

Differences and Similarities Between Conventional Therapy and Coaching

Conventional Therapy Coaching
A therapeutic relationship. Disclosure of social and personal information is strategic, limited and driven by what may be beneficial to the client. A partnership. Social and personal information is exchanged choicefully but more freely as appropriate.
Focus on diagnosable conditions. Assess for diagnosable conditions (e.g. anxiety, depression, trauma, addictions, compulsions, emotional issues, neurosis, psychosis, etc.) Focus on everyday situations. Assess for situations, dilemmas, and desired changes in life, relationships, work or other areas specific to the type of coaching.
Orientation is from present to past; looks backward. Healing the past so the present and the future can be more functional. Orientation is from present to future; looks forward. Creating the desired future. Aimed at learning, improvement, achievement.
Treatment, healing/cure orientation. Fosters self-discovery, co-creation, experimentation.
Facilitates movement from unconscious to conscious level. Facilitates movement from conscious to consciousness level.
Aim is usually to bring the person to normal functioning. Aim is usually to increase performance, satisfaction and/or success
Driven by unresolved issues. Goal is issue resolution. Driven by a desire to make changes in life, work, relationships, or whatever the focus of the coaching is. Goal is to increase possibilities, make choices, choose goals and take action.
Is more feeling and discussion oriented. Feelings are explored and named but are not necessarily the major focus. Is more co-inquiry and action oriented.
More focused on the “Why?” Why me? Why this? Why this now? Takes deep dives into the why on a more personal level (e.g. family dynamics, traumas, emotional/psychological history) to explain the current situation/behavior and suggest appropriate treatment/interventions. Asks “Why?” to better understand the story, and the link between the person’s relevant history and present behavior, however, the emphasis is more on what and how. Examples: What possibilities are you most excited about? What triggers this behavior at work? How do you envision this playing out in the future? How do you explain this?
Provides expert help.  Can provide expertise but the major focus is on creating a partnership.

Differences and Similarities Between Conventional Therapy and Coaching

Conventional Therapy
A therapeutic relationship. Disclosure of social and personal information is strategic, limited and driven by what may be beneficial to the client.
Focus on diagnosable conditions. Assess for diagnosable conditions (e.g. anxiety, depression, trauma, addictions, compulsions, emotional issues, neurosis, psychosis, etc.)
Orientation is from present to past; looks backward. Healing the past so the present and the future can be more functional.
Treatment, healing/cure orientation.
Facilitates movement from unconscious to conscious level.
Aim is usually to bring the person to normal functioning.
Driven by unresolved issues. Goal is issue resolution.
Is more feeling and discussion oriented.
More focused on the “Why?” Why me? Why this? Why this now? Takes deep dives into the why on a more personal level (e.g. family dynamics, traumas, emotional/psychological history) to explain the current situation/behavior and suggest appropriate treatment/interventions.
Provides expert help.
Coaching
A partnership. Social and personal information is exchanged choicefully but more freely as appropriate.
Focus on everyday situations. Assess for situations, dilemmas, and desired changes in life, relationships, work or other areas specific to the type of coaching.
Orientation is from present to future; looks forward. Creating the desired future. Aimed at learning, improvement, achievement.
Fosters self-discovery, co-creation, experimentation.
Facilitates movement from conscious to consciousness level.
Aim is usually to increase performance, satisfaction and/or success
Driven by a desire to make changes in life, work, relationships, or whatever the focus of the coaching is. Goal is to increase possibilities, make choices, choose goals and take action.
Feelings are explored and named but are not necessarily the major focus. Is more co-inquiry and action oriented.
Asks “Why?” to better understand the story, and the link between the person’s relevant history and present behavior, however, the emphasis is more on what and how. Examples: What possibilities are you most excited about? What triggers this behavior at work? How do you envision this playing out in the future? How do you explain this?
 Can provide expertise but the major focus is on creating a partnership.